Have a Happy, Healthy Christmas

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
Holiday gatherings, seasonal treats, and celebratory menus can wreak havoc a healthy nutrition regimen for even the most dedicated dieter. Last week we listed several pointers to avoid stress while preparing for your celebrations. Finally, it’s time enjoy the holiday! Remember, one meal or one day of celebration is not going to doom you to obesity when if you ‘fall off the wagon’ when you eat healthy foods and exercise the rest of the year. Allow yourself enough latitude to enjoy the day and get back to work the next day with these helpful hints.
 
• Eat breakfast! Skipping breakfast sets you up for overeating later in the day!
 
• Plan. If you’ve reached your tipping point and have decided to lose, target for a 1 pound loss during the next week. Reduce your daily calorie intake by 200 to 300 calories and burn off 200 to 300 calories a day for a weekly deficit of 3,500 calorie. Add an extra day to your exercise routine. Don’t have routine? Walk for fifteen minutes a day!
 
• Start a food diary. Research proves that keeping a food diary is a valuable weight loss technique. Start again to track what you’re eating and how much, it’s a real eye-opener!
 
• Control snacking. Drink a glass of water instead of reaching for the left over Christmas cookies, then wait about 10 minutes to see if you are really hungry. Thirst can be mistaken for hunger, if you’re still hungry, have a small, healthy snack.
 
• Don’t skip meals. Research has shown that eating regular meals or snacks every 3 to 4 hours can keep you from overeating.
 
• Stay active. If you didn’t get any exercise today, relieve that belly bloat by going for a 10-minute walk after eating.
 
• Get enough sleep. Research shows there are links between inadequate sleep and obesity. A study from Case Western Reserve University of about 68,000 middle-age women found that those who slept 5 or fewer hours were 32% more likely to experience major weight gain, and 15% more likely to become obese, than those who slept an average of 7 hours.
 
• Eat slowly to make your meal last longer. Research shows the more chewing you do, the more nutrients your body absorbs. It takes 20 minutes for the body to register that it’s satisfied, slower eating will cut down on the second helpings!
 
Leave the guilt behind. It will only get in your way, and make it harder to get back on track!
 
Happy Holidays to you and all your loved ones!
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail program at www.dunhamsrewards.com

Seasonal Allergies

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
Pollen is in the air and many of us are preparing for the onslaught of itchy eyes, sneezing and runny noses that come with seasonal allergies. According to the Center for Disease Control, seasonal allergies, also known as hayfever or allergic rhinitis, was diagnosed in 17.6 million people in the United States last year. Seasonal allergies are a short-term inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nasal passages which is caused by airborne pollens from trees, grasses, flowers, and weeds. Allergy season in the U.S. can start as early as February in southern states and May in the midwest.
 
As mentioned above, seasonal allergies have a host of debilitating symptoms, and demand attention and care so you can enjoy this beautiful time of year. can be worrying, especially for people who are otherwise healthy and unused to experiencing sudden debilitating symptoms. If left unchecked, seasonal allergies can often turn an otherwise enjoyable time of year for many into misery.There are many ‘standard procedures’ for controlling the symptoms and recently natural remedies have proved themselves invaluable for many people.
 
• Avoid triggers. When possible, stay inside when pollen counts are at their highest. Pollen count usually is at its highest the morning hours and remains high during the afternoon.Wear wraparound sunglasses to protect your eyes!
 
• Minimize indoor risks. If possible, keep windows closed during high pollen count periods. If you use an air conditioner, be sure to use a high quality filter. Vacuuming and dusting will help eliminate any pollen that has entered the home, when dusting, use a damp cloth that will capture the pollen.
 
• Probiotics. In allergies, the immune system may react too strongly to a stimuli — such as pollen. New research has indicated that the presence of beneficial bacteria in the gut with may reduce risks for allergies.
 
• Nettle is a folk remedy for the sneezing, itching, and swelling associated with allergies. It contains quercetin, which inhibits the release of histamine. One study found that the herb was at least moderately effective in reducing allergy symptoms for more than half of those who took nettle.
 
• Butterbur. In a study published by the British Medical Journal, a group of Swiss researchers found that just tablet of butterbur — an herbal shrub that grows in wet, marshy ground –taken four times daily is as effective as a popular antihistamine drug to control symptoms of hay fever.
 
Hayfever sufferers all have individual allergic responses, some people will be able to cope handle their allergies with over-the-counter medication, natural remedies, and limiting their exposure to allergens. Others may need the care of a health care professional. If you do have concerns or your methods of dealing with hayfever is not enough, see your a health care provider for assistance.
 
May and June are beautiful months. We all deserve to enjoy them.
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail or text message programs (or both). Sign Up Now

Starting the New Year Right!

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
Whatever your New Years resolutions, there are small additions to your lifestyle that will pay big dividends to your overall health and help you attain your health goals for 2014. They’re simple, easy ways to help you start off on the right foot.
 
• Add beans to your menus: Be sure you include beans in your nutritional regimen — and include black beans. Not only are they a great source of protein, recent studies suggest that the darker the bean, the more antioxidants! Interestingly, beans are considered a separate food group in Brazil, and are part of their food pyramid. The U.S. Government’s Dietary Guidelines urge adults to consume one and a half cups of cooked dry beans a week.
 
• Snack on nuts: The risk of dying of heart disease dropped 29 percent and the risk of dying of cancer fell 11 percent among those who had nuts seven or more times a week compared with people who never ate them. These positive results were seen from peanuts, pistachios, almonds, walnuts and other tree nuts. And for those of you with weight-loss resolutions: nut eaters were slimmer. Research has shown that snacking on nuts can curb your appetite for the whole day.
 
• Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables: Raw or fresh, eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits can reduce risk for heart disease, certain types of cancers, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Vegetables are also low in calories and high in fiber! According to the latest dietary guidelines a person who needs 2,000 calories a day to maintain weight and health, should eat nine servings of fruit and vegetables. That equals 4-1/2 cups a day, 2 cups of fruit and 2-1/2 cups of vegetables.
 
• Use healthy oils: Get rid of the unhealthy fats in you diet, start by adding healthy fats where possible! Olive and canola oils are monounsaturated fats, which can lower cholesterol levels, high blood pressure,and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Canola oil, walnut and flaxseed oils are great sources of omega-3 fatty acids, a type of fat that is known to reduce arthritis pain and improve cholesterol levels.
 
• Read the labels: Processed food contains sugars, sodium and unhealthy fats, along with many additives that are used to maintain the appearance of freshness. Keep away from frozen entrees and microwaveable dinners.
 
Finally, exercise! Your entire body benefits from a workout. It gives a boost to memory and concentration, lowers cholesterol, and reduces blood pressure. Exercise is vital for prevention of disease. You should have a minimum of 2-1/2 hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, or a minimum of 1-1/4 hours per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity; combine them in a way works for you and build up from there. You’ll look better and feel better!
 
Happy New Year from everyone at Peter’s Principles. Thank you for your support in 2013!
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail or text message programs (or both). Sign Up Now

Holiday Eating Tips

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
The holiday parties and family gatherings are in full swing. The whirlwind of preparing for and partaking in the festivities can really take us off guard, no matter how many years we’ve prepared for it. You want to enjoy warmth and love of the season, but you certainly don’t want to pay for it with those extra pounds later! There are a few easy steps you can take that will help you maintain your weight without distracting you from the moment.
 
• Have a small healthy snack before you leave the house. Walnuts are a great choice. They’re packed with protein and fiber, making them an excellent choice for keeping hunger at bay.
 
• Go easy on the appetizers, choose vegetables and fruits with dip or whole-grain crackers.
 
• If you’re at a buffet, start on the salad end of the table. If you’re the host, put the fruit and vegetables at the beginning of the table. A recently conducted study with 124 adults asked participants to select food from two breakfast buffets. The first buffet table had fruit and other healthy foods at the front of the table with fattier foods at the end, while the second buffet had the fatty foods at the front of the table and healthy foods at the end. Both tables contained the same items.
 
Eighty-six percent of the participants chose fruit when it was the first item on the buffet table, compared to 54 percent who selected fruit when it was at the end of the table. They also found that the first three food items chosen from the buffet made up 66 percent of their total choices, regardless of whether the items were high or low-calorie foods.
 
• Try using smaller plates for your meals if they’re available! Different studies have shown that smaller plates lead to actually eating less!
 
• Don’t let yourself feel deprived, have a dessert or cookie, AFTER you’ve eaten a healthy meal!
 
Even though you’re may be much busier than usual, make time for exercise. Exercise not only helps prevent weight gain, it relieves holiday stress. Add an extra 15-minute walk or run to your fitness schedule to help offset holiday eating.
 
Follow these simple suggestions and support your overall goals throughout the holidays into the New Year!
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail or text message programs (or both). Sign Up Now