Cat Got Your Back

Cat® outerwear delivers warmth, comfort and convenience.
 
Winter is difficult enough for those of us who have brief forays into the elements. For those who tend to spend a great deal of time braving the weather – such as those who work outdoors or have an active outdoor lifestyle – winter can be downright brutal, making staying warm of the utmost importance. Dunham’s Sports offers a wide variety of products specifically designed for the latter group, including the following three jackets from Caterpillar, a company famous for its farming and construction equipment. All three jackets offer premium construction with the highest quality materials and numerous features to make daily tasks easy to accomplish while warding off the elements.
 
Insulated Twill Jacket
 
“Keeping warm and dry is what the Insulated Twill Jacket is all about. It features a hideaway hood in the collar so you can quickly raise it when needed and tuck it away when you don’t. It also features a two-way front zip with snap closure to help keep warmth in and weather out,” said Eric Hartmann of Cat Apparel.
 
Available in black, the Insulated Twill Jacket offers quilted insulated lining for warmth and maximum performance. The hood can be custom-fit via a drawcord and the cuffs are adjustable, thanks to a hook and loop tab closure.
 
“The Insulated Twill Jacket, which is water resistant and windproof, is the do-it-all jacket for the do-it-all person,” Hartmann added.
 
Defender Insulated Jacket
 
When additional insulation is required, consider the Cat Defender Insulated Jacket.
 
“Our Defender Insulated Jacket is an all-winter insulated jacket built for functionality. It features a water-resistant finish, highly durable nylon ripstop fabric and active weight insulation,” Hartmann added.
 
To help you retain your body heat while helping keep cold, wind and wet weather out, the Defender Insulated Jacket offers a number of thoughtful features. A full front zipper with storm flap and beard guard, a stand-up collar, adjustable cuffs and an adjustable draw cord with cord locks – all work together to ensure you stay warm and comfortable.
 
If you work outdoors in the winter, you know how important it is to be seen in low-light conditions. The Defender Insulated Jacket has you covered with reflective Caterpillar logos on the left chest panel and back collar.
 
“Anyone who tends to spend a significant amount of time outdoors in the winter will truly appreciate the Defender Insulated Jacket’s quilted, insulated body. It delivers enhanced warmth and maximum protection,” Hartmann said.
 
Heavy Insulated Parka
 
For those bitterly cold winter days, check out the Cat Heavy Insulated Parka.
 
“We like to say that our Heavy Insulated Parka does two things exceptionally well: keep you warm and help make sure you are visible in low-light conditions, thanks to our reflective webbing across the chest and back,” Hartmann said.
 
Available in Army Moss, the Heavy Insulated Parka features a two-way full front zip, storm flap with storm closure, draw cords and cord locks for optimal protection against the elements.
 
“What I really like about our Heavy Insulated Parka is its removable, microfleece-lined hood. Zip it off when you don’t need it. Zip it on and draw the draw cord tight to keep your head warm when conditions dictate it,” Hartmann explained.
 
Warm, Durable and Convenient
 
All three jackets feature highly durable, water-resistant outer layers and 100% polyester taffeta interior lining for optimal comfort. All three also offer numerous pockets, ensuring there’s a place for everything and everything in its place.
 
With as many as eight pockets in the Heavy Insulated Parka, five in the Insulated Twill Jacket and four in the Defender Jacket, you won’t run out of places to put things. In the Defender Jacket for example, there are pockets for a tablet and another to store gloves or a knit hat.
 
Going the extra distance, the Heavy Insulated Parka features hand-warmer pockets that are lined with microfleece, an inside pocket for cellphones and two vertical pockets under the storm placket to ensure items stored there are protected from the elements.
 
No matter the model, nearly every pocket includes a closure system to ensure items stay securely in place. That’s indicative of the dedication Caterpillar puts into ensuring its apparel is comfortable and functional.
 
“The Cat brand is one of the most prolific in the construction and mining sectors and its Cat logo is iconic. We put the same level of attention to detail and commitment to the highest quality in our apparel as is put into our heavy-duty equipment,” Hartmann said.
 
Dunham’s Sports carries a vast array of Cat apparel. Be sure to stop by your local store and speak with a knowledgeable sales professional who can help you choose the jacket that is most ideally suited to your needs, ensuring warmth and comfort all winter long.
 
-Your Friends at Dunham’s
 
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Toasty Warm When It’s Cold Outside

Under Armour’s ColdGear Infrared is Your Cold-Weather Solution.
 
Two years ago, based on research conducted to write a similar article, I went to my local Dunham’s Sports and bought Under Armour ColdGear Infrared leggings and crew neck top. I wanted something that would help keep me warm during Michigan’s early spring and late fall, thereby extending my golf season. At the same time, the apparel had to be lightweight, not bulky, ensuring full range of motion. (The freer the swing, the longer and straighter the shots.) The ColdGear Infrared products have lived up to their billing.
 
These offerings go well beyond the compression products commonly used by cold-weather outdoor enthusiasts. What makes them special is a soft, thermo-conductive coating on the inside of the garment that absorbs and retains body heat, which is then redistributed evenly, keeping the wearer warmer, longer.
 
Here’s how: the thermo-coating on ColdGear Infrared products has ceramic particles that take advantage of ceramic’s heat-transference properties. (It’s why your coffee stays warmer longer in a ceramic mug, versus a paper or plastic cup and why ceramic tiles are used on military aircraft and the Space Shuttle.)
 
Absorb and Redistribute Body Heat
 
ColdGear Infrared goes beyond trapping body heat. It absorbs the heat we generate and redistributes it, creating a “microclimate” inside the material. I have definitely noticed the difference that wearing my ColdGear Infrared has made. I’ve been comfortable golfing in sunny, 45-degree weather wearing minimal layers. I also like the fact that these products feature anti-odor technology to prevent the growth of odor-causing microbes and include a moisture transport system that wicks perspiration away from the skin, further enhancing comfort.
 
ColdGear Infrared All Over
 
I’ve already started my holiday wish list and to my baselayer I plan on adding ColdGear Infrared quarter-zip jackets. They deliver all of the features and benefits of the baselayer, plus added technology to repel water and block the wind. Another item high on my list is a ColdGear Infrared beanie. Being follicle-challenged, I lose a lot of heat from my head, so this will find its way into my golf bag prior to next spring, as will a pair of the company’s ColdGear Infrared socks. Available in a variety of styles, these socks will keep my feet, another source of heat loss, warmer than my day-to-day socks. As such, I will have ColdGear Infrared products keeping me warm from head to toe.
 
Under Armour’s ColdGear Infrared products go well beyond keeping golfers like me warm. For example, the company’s shell jackets and Snocone pants are ideal for any type of snow sports— snowmobiling, skiing, snowboarding, etc. Available in a wide variety of colors, including camo, the pants are 100% waterproof and feature fully taped seams to prevent moisture from seeping through. They are specifically designed to deliver maximum warmth were the body needs it—such as in the seat and knee areas.
 
The shell jackets, meanwhile, feature a RECCO® avalanche rescue reflector to keep the wearer safe in an emergency. They also feature a helmet-compatible hood with a back zip expander, ensuring the hood lies against your head, whether you’re wearing a helmet or not. Runners might want to check out ColdGear Infrared Engage Run gloves and Run headbands.
 
Subhead: ColdGear Infrared for Everyone
 
ColdGear Infrared products also include accessories and hunting apparel and the company offers what it calls transitional outerwear. These are mid-weight items that are ideal for mid-fall and mid-spring in the Midwest and can be worn as lifestyle apparel.
 
Under Armour’s ColdGear Infrared products are available for men, women, boys and girls and for a variety of sports. While the calendar says that winter doesn’t officially start until December 21, we Midwesterners know that the nip in the air starts long before that date. This year, rather than hibernating, I plan on outfitting myself with a host of ColdGear Infrared products and trying my hand at some winter activities, taking comfort in the knowledge I’ll be warm without the need for bulky clothing.
 
Be sure to check out your favorite Dunham’s Sports store for the full range of Under Armour ColdGear Infrared products and meet me on the slopes (possibly) or on the links next spring (much more likely).
 
-Your Friends at Dunham’s
 
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Sun Safety

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
The first day of summer is June 21st and we are already enjoying the warm, bright days that come with the season. Protecting ourselves from damaging ultraviolet rays is even more important now, the sun is brighter, we’re more active in outdoor activities, and summer styles expose more skin to the elements. The sun is the primary source ultraviolet rays, and too much exposure can be dangerous. So how do we enjoy the season while protecting ourselves? It is important to to avoid being outdoors in direct sunlight too long, especially between the hours of 10 am and 4 pm when UV light is strongest. Remember, if your shadow is shorter than you are, the sun’s rays are at their height… protect yourself. Fortunately, there are some some simple steps that offer protection from ultraviolet rays.
 
Stay in the Shade
 
Wear a broad-brimmed hat. Faces, particularly noses and ears, are especially susceptible to melanoma.
Do you enjoy sitting outside on the patio? Use an umbrella!
Shady trees with dense foliage are our natural protection against the sun’s damaging rays.
 
Protect your skin with clothing
 
Wear clothing to cover as much skin as possible. Shorts and tank tops are favorite summer styles so this is a hard one.
Dark colors generally provide more protection than light colors.
Tightly woven fabric protects better than loosely woven, sheer or gauzy clothing.
Synthetic fibers such as polyester, lycra, nylon, and acrylic are more protective than cottons.
Shiny or satin semi-synthetic fabrics like rayon or tercel reflect more UV than linen.
 
Use Sunscreen
 
Sunscreens list their level of sun protective factor by SPF. An SPF of 15 blocks 93 percent of UVB rays, SPF 30 blocks 97 percent and SPF 50 blocks 98 percent.
Look for a broad-spectrum sunscreen that provides protection against both UVA and UVB rays.
Read the label, follow application directions and reapply a minimum of every two hours.
 
Wear Sunglasses that Block Ultraviolet Rays
 
Sunglasses should block 99% to 100% of UVA and UVB rays. The label on the sunglasses should say “UV absorption up to 400 nm” or “Meets ANSI UV Requirements” — which means they block at least 99% of ultraviolet rays. Glasses labelled “cosmetic” only block approximately 70% of the rays.
Darkness of the sunglasses is not a factor. UV ray glasses are protected with an invisible chemical in or applied to the lenses.
Try large-framed or wraparound sunglasses that will protect eyes from light coming in from different directions.
 
Children Need Extra Attention
 
If your child burns easily, take extra precautions. Cover up, limit exposure, and apply sunscreen.
Babies younger than 6 months should be kept out of direct sunlight. Use hats and protective clothing.
 
Our bodies make vitamin D — which is vital to good health — when our skin is exposed to the sun. The sun brings us essential benefits … but cover up before you burn!
 
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Under Armour: A History of Innovation

The axiom is that if you build a better mouse trap, the world will beat a path to your door. In 1996, Kevin Plank decided he wanted to build a better T-shirt, one that would help athletes better regulate their body heat by wicking perspiration away from their body, thereby keeping them cooler and dryer. He created the original compression T-shirt and founded Under Armour.
 
Under Armour’s desire for innovation quickly resulted in the ColdGear® mock turtleneck, which was launched in 1998. Still available today, ColdGear products give wearers the ability to battle the elements with a soft, brushed inner layer that circulates heat, and an element-battling outer layer that keeps them dry and protected.
 
ColdGear Infrared
 
Helping athletes and the rest of us stay even warmer in cold weather is Under Armour’s ColdGear Infrared, introduced in 2013.
 
“ColdGrear Infrared products go well beyond the compression products favored by many cold-weather outdoor enthusiasts. It features a soft, thermo-conductive coating on the inside of the garment that absorbs and retains body heat. Then, by taking advantage of a print format also incorporated into the inner layer of the product, the absorbed heat is redistributed evenly, keeping wearers warmer longer,” said Under Armour’s Brendan Hanley.
 
ColdGear Infrared is ideally suited for any snow sport. It’s lightweight and it’s not bulky, meaning it’s not cumbersome, thereby providing full range of motion. That also makes it ideal when you’re looking to extend the season of your favorite activity. A number of my fellow golfers use wear ColdGear Infrared apparel in early spring and late fall.
 
“For those who are likely to spend a great deal of time outdoors this winter, we recommend beginning with a ColdGear Infrared baselayer that includes leggings and a fitted mock turtleneck or crew neck shirt,” Hanley added.
 
From this base, it’s easy to transition into mid- and outer layers that are sport-specific. For example, for hunters, Under Armour offers ColdGear Infrared camo jackets and pants with the company’s UA Scent Control technology. This outer layer is 100% waterproof and features tapered seams to keep you completely dry and protected from the elements.
 
“Don’t overlook the importance of keeping your extremities warm. A number of our Under Armour hats, gloves and footwear also feature ColdGear Infrared, making them ideal for colder weather,” Hanley explained.
 
For additional warmth, a number of Under Armour products, including outer shells and boots, feature PrimaLoft insulation, a proprietary combination of natural down material and high-performance synthetics for optimal warmth. It was created by an Under Armour partner.
 
“Staying warm in cold weather used to require bundling up so much that movement was difficult. That’s not the case anymore. Our products with PrimaLoft insulation, for example, are lightweight, water-resistant, breathable, and can be compressed without losing warmth. A great deal of our hunting apparel features both PrimaLoft and ColdGear Infrared technologies, ensuring warmth and maximum movement for more successful hunts,” Hanley said.
 
UA MagZip
 
One of the latest innovations from Under Armour is this year’s UA MagZip. It features an ingenious design that makes it easier to zip jackets using only one hand.
 
“Our UA MagZip features magnetic male and female connections, so the minute the zipper ends get close, they line up and snap together. This a huge leap forward for anyone who’s ever had to fumble with lining up a zipper while wearing gloves,” Hanley added.
 
The idea for the MagZip came from Under Armour’s Future Show Open Innovation Challenge, a contest that allows entrepreneurs to submit ideas for consideration. It was submitted by someone who has a family member with myotonic dystrophy, a genetic disorder that affects many parts of the body.
 
Innovations Abound
 
Here are a few other noteworthy Under Armour innovations:
 
• Charged Cotton – 2011. It features the comfort of cotton, but dries much faster and performs with an athlete’s body.
 
• Charged Cotton Storm – 2011. It adds water-resistance to Charged Cotton, enabling the wearer to stay warm and dry. This makes Charged Cotton Storm ideal for hiking, running, practicing or playing.
 
• Coldblack – 2011. There’s a reason why summer colors are lighter and winter colors are darker. Darker fabrics absorb the sun’s UV rays and heat up quickly, while lighter ones repel UV rays. Thanks to Under Armour’s coldblack, a revolutionary fabric that reflects even the nastiest heat, you can wear black (or other dark colors) even in the middle of summer.
 
Kevin Plank went well beyond building a better mousetrap. What started as a business in Plank’s grandmother’s basement is today a global, multi-billion-dollar brand, creating some of the most innovative apparel, footwear and accessories in the industry. That’s testament to the company’s dedication to continual improvement.
 
Visit your local Dunham’s Sport and speak with one of our knowledgeable experts to discover Under Armour products that can make your favorite sport or hobby more enjoyable.
 
-Your Friends at Dunham’s
 
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Stay Warmer Longer with High-Tech Apparel

Coldgear® Infrared from Under Armour Incorporates Space-Age Technology and Innovative Materials
 
By the time this magazine is available at your local Dunham’s Sports store, the Midwest is heading toward the coldest months of the year. The frigid temperatures, however, don’t have to deter you from pursuing your passion: skiing, snowboarding, ice fishing, heck, even golf if there’s no snow on the ground. And while sport-specific apparel has been available for these outdoor activities for many years, today’s technology is designed to keep you warmer longer, without being bulky. One such product available at Dunham’s Sports is the new Coldgear Infrared line from Under Armour.
 
“Our Coldgear Infrared is ideally suited for any snow sport. It’s lightweight and it’s not bulky, meaning it’s not cumbersome, thereby providing full range of motion,” said Brendan Hanley of Under Armour.
 
Coldgear Infrared products go well beyond the compression products favored by many cold-weather outdoor enthusiasts. It features a soft, thermo-conductive coating on the inside of the garment that absorbs and retains body heat. Then, by taking advantage of a print format also incorporated into the inner layer of the product, the absorbed heat is redistributed evenly, keeping wearers warmer longer.
 
“Perhaps the best analogy I can use to explain our Coldgear Infrared technology is a ceramic coffee mug. Compare that coffee mug to a paper or plastic one and I’m sure you’ll agree the coffee stays warmer longer in a ceramic mug because of the heat-transference aspect of ceramic,” Hanley explained. “The thermo-coating we use on our Coldgear Infrared has ceramic particles for the same reason.”
 
Advanced Aircraft Technology
 
If ceramic doesn’t exactly sound high-tech, keep in mind that numerous military aircraft and the Space Shuttle feature ceramic coating on their outer skins. The ceramic coating absorbs infrared waves, a kind of heat. On the Space Shuttle, the ceramic tiles also insulate the aircraft, ensuring the heat buildup during re-entry is kept away from the aircraft’s interior.
 
While traditional cold-weather gear is designed to trap body heat, Under Armour’s Coldgear Infrared goes a couple of steps further.
 
“In essence, our Coldgear Infrared garments becomes living things. They absorb the heat generated by the wearer and redistribute it, creating what we call a ‘microclimate’ inside the material,” Hanley added. While the weather may be near freezing, you can be comfortably warm, enabling you to pursue your passion for longer periods of time.
 
Start With A Solid Base
 
Dunham’s Sports carries a variety of Coldgear Infrared products. For ultimate warmth, we recommend beginning with a baselayer that includes leggings and a fitted mock turtleneck or crew neck shirt. These baselayer items sit close to the skin without the squeeze of compression apparel. They are lightweight, feature four-way stretch material for maximum flexibility and anti-odor technology to prevent the growth of odor-causing microbes. They also feature a moisture transport system that wicks perspiration away from the skin, further enhancing comfort.
 
From this base, your choices are endless and sport-specific. For example, for those of us who wish we could golf year-round in the Midwest, Under Armour offers Coldgear Infrared quarter-zip jackets. They deliver all of the features and benefits of the baselayer, plus add technology to repel water and block the wind. (PGA professional Hunter Mahan wears these products during the early and late part of the season. They’re also ideal for play during the British Open.)
 
The company’s shell jackets and snocone pants are ideal for any type of snow sports: snowmobiling, skiing, snowboarding, etc. Available in a wide variety of colors, including camo, the pants are 100% waterproof and feature fully taped seams to prevent moisture from seeping through. They are specifically designed to deliver maximum warmth where the body needs it (more in the seat and knee areas, for example) and can withstand 10,000 mm of rainfall (nearly 394 inches) in a 24-hour period.
 
The shell jackets, meanwhile, can withstand 20,000 mm of rainfall in a 24-hour period and feature a RECCO® avalanche rescue reflector to keep the wearer safe in an emergency. It also features a helmet-compatible hood with a back zip expander, ensuring the hood lies against your head, whether you’re wearing a helmet or not.
 
-Ski Bum
 
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Gear Up Fore The Season

 
High-Tech and Bold Colors Come to Golf Apparel
 
A s snow relinquishes its grip on the Midwest, we’re finally seeing some color: green on our lawns, red on robins’ breasts and a rainbow of bright colors in Dunham’s Sports golf apparel offerings.
 
“For 2013, we’re seeing an explosion of color, with more prints on shirts and bolder colors, making it easier for fashion-conscious golfers to mix and match,” said Scott Taylor of Under Armour.
 
That sentiment is echoed by Michael Zampini of Callaway Apparel.
 
“A big trend for spring is color. We’re seeing a big push to heathered fabric,” Zampini said. “People want to have the right apparel on the course. They want their apparel to fit and have it look and feel like they belong on the course, whether they actually do or not.”
 
Finding the right golf apparel is no problem, since Dunham’s Sports carries a wide assortment of styles from the leading brands, including the aforementioned Under Armour and Callaway, as well as Adidas, Canyon Creek, FootJoy, Nike, PGA Tour and TaylorMade.
 
Like your golf clubs, today’s golf apparel is high-tech, with special materials designed to keep you comfortable year-round.
 
During the early and later parts of golf season, the key is staying warm and the brands available at your local Dunham’s Sports have you covered.
 
“Layering is extremely important to heat retention. Our HeatGear® compression products keep you warm without being bulky,” Taylor said.
 
That approach changes for the summer, when the objective is to keep you cool.
 
“We build our brand around all-performance fabrication, with moisture-management products that keep golfers cooler in warm weather,” said Roddy Millichamp of PGA TOUR.
 
“Every brand offers a polo shirt that wicks moisture. At Callaway, we go one step further, with a shirt that features a ventilated back panel. The difference it makes is significant,” Zampini said.
 
Helping keep you cool is a given. Many manufacturers also offer odor-resistant technology and a level of protection against the sun’s damaging ultraviolet rays. Think about it: today’s golf apparel keeps you cool, fresher and protects your skin!
 
Most of the products mentioned in this article are also available for women. In fact, PGA TOUR kicked off its Ladies Tour line this year.
 
“This is a great-looking lineup that doesn’t have to be worn strictly on the course,” Millichamp said. “It includes shorts, skorts and capris. The bottoms hook up with sleeved and sleeveless tops and offer the same high-tech functionality of the men’s line.”
 
Spring, summer and fall, Dunham’s Sports has the serious golfer covered with apparel specifically designed for the season. These are the same products worn by PGA players and available to you at terrific prices, meaning there’s more money left over for additional rounds or new clubs.
 
See you on the links!
 
-Par Shooter
 

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Clothes Makes the Hunter

While your choice of weapons may be the single most important factor in hunting, what you wear is also important. Not only should your clothing help disguise you from your prey, but your choice of boots and outerwear will be a big factor in how comfortable you are.
 
From the Ground Up
 
Hunting boots are the obvious place to start because at some point you’re going to have to get to your prey. What to look for in a boot depends on the type of hunting you will do. “If you’re constantly moving in search of prey, then flexibility and durability will be most important to you,” says Trent Busenbark of Bushnell Boots. “But if you’re in a tree stand most of the time just waiting for deer, then insulation and warmth will be your priorities because you’ll have less circulation to keep your blood warm.”
 
Keeping water out of your boots is an important consideration if you are hunting near lakes and in marshland.  While you can always add waterproofing protection to your boots, it’s obviously better to start with designs that keep the water out.
 
Sophisticated Designs
 
High-tech engineering has long been part of the boot design business, with sophisticated polymers and foam design. For example, EVA (ethyl vinyl acetate) is a compression-molded foam that combines durability with light weight design. So-called “memory foams” also emphasize comfort. These mold to the shape of the foot and provide close to a custom fit. Keeping water out of boots is obviously a priority, and technology such as neoprene rubber has greatly improved water resistance in hunting boot design.
 
Recognizing that different parts of the foot require different amounts of support, Bushnell uses varying densities for the insole, toe and heel. That kind of design takes into account how your foot actually works. Above all, the emphasis is on comfort. “You put these boots on, and you think you’re wearing tennis shoes,” Busenbark says.
 
Under Armour has come up with a specific design for tree-stand hunting. Its HAW (Hurry Up and Wait) boots use an air-mesh lining that increases airflow and also wicks sweat from the foot — a characteristic the company has become famous for in its high compression athletic wear. These boots also use heel lock memory foam that features higher viscosity and density for more support and comfort.
 
Clothes That Get the Job Done
 
Hunting clothes are a lot like work clothes — you’re more interested in them helping you get a job done than looking good (though that’s a plus, of course). Fit is very important because you’ll be doing a lot of different kind of stretching and exercising. When you raise your arms up, the whole jacket shouldn’t go up with them. And if you’re going to climb into a deer blind you want the pants to be cut plenty loose.
 
Temperatures vary greatly during hunting season and what is warm and snuggly at dawn may be stifling hot when the noontime sun arrives. The answer is layering — so you can peel back clothes as the mercury rises. It’s the same concept used in all kinds of winter activities in the Midwest, but some hunting apparel manufacturers have advanced the idea. Rocky Brands has introduced three different layers — Level I, II and III, to ensure temperature flexibility. “By the time you’ve stripped down to Level I, it’s almost like you’re in a t-shirt,” says company representative Sam Bowman.
 
While layering is a universal concept, there are specific clothing technologies designed for the hunter.  Various manufacturing techniques provide additional warmth as well as waterproofing. And there are ways clothing can make your quieter in the woods. Under Armour’s Ridge Reaper® Camo Shell Jacket uses strategically stretched four-way fabric that reduces noise from the clothing.
 
Besides clothing, there are different color and tag requirements that vary state by state. David Avila from Master Sportsman suggests asking your Dunham’s sales associate for your local information.
 
Passing the Smell Test
 
The most acute sense for most animals is smell. Thus, it is critical you mask your scent in the field, and that is much more difficult than using camouflage or staying quiet. Virtually everything we come in contact affects how we smell. You can cover up smells, but the most effective way to eliminate them is with clothing designed to trap those odors.
 
Scent-Lok has been a pioneer in this field, using activated carbon. The system uses the process of physical adsorption, similar to a sponge only with air instead of water. In the fabric of clothing the carbon creates a bond that traps odor molecules produced by the body. Activated carbon acts like microscopic Velcro. When the odor molecules come into contact with the activated carbon, they are trapped within the pores until the product is reactivated.
 
Reactivation is achieved by putting the activated carbon fabric in a dryer where the heat from the dryer will break the bond with the odor compounds. The odor compounds are released and the activated carbon is virtually as good as new. Typically, reactivation should occur after 30 to 40 hours of use, but always check the garment for washing and drying instructions.
 
Under Armour has introduced new scent control clothing where the reactivation occurs in the washer, not the dryer. “The advantage,” according to Under Armour’s Eddie Stevenson, “is that you don’t need to have the heat of the dryer and the product will last longer.”
 
Camouflage Underwear?
 
And if you just have to be completely ready for the hunt, how about some camouflage underwear? Under Armour makes camo-design boxer briefs, but they aren’t just for “show.” They have the Under Armour signature sweat wicking power along with anti-odor technology.
 
-Deer Abby
 
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THE HIGH TECH WORLD OF WARMTH

You associate the words “high tech” with computers, electronics, and video games. But clothing? Yes, clothing. Especially warm weather clothing for active people.  Jackets, parkas, linings — they’ve all undergone a scientific overhaul designed to make you warmer, drier and more comfortable. In the “old days,” staying warm outside was pretty simple — bundle up with heavy materials to keep you (relatively) comfortable in sub-zero weather. But as winter lifestyles trended toward more athletic pursuits, mobility became a priority, as was staying dry. Clothing manufacturers who have found ways to provide warmth and dryness without bulk have seen their sales skyrocket.

Lots of Names

These days, shopping for winter clothing usually involves at least a cursory visit to the U.S. Patent Office. Virtually all manufacturers have patented, trademarked, copyrighted or at least registered their proprietary technologies.  Perhaps the best known material is Gore-Tex®, first introduced in 1969. Using a polymer construction (actually an expanded polytetraflourethylene for you science geeks), Gore-Tex has an outer layer to keep liquid moisture from penetrating, and its microporous structure aids the body’s natural cooling process by allowing perspiration vapor to escape.

Columbia Sportswear has its family of technologies: Omni-Tech® provides maximum waterproof-breathable protection, while allowing moisture to move away from the skin, Omni-Shield® prevents most water from making contact with the inner clothing layers, and Omni-Dry™ disperses sweat away from the body for quick evaporation.

Trespass utilizes Tres-Tex® technology. It uses special coatings and membranes which keep external moisture off the fabric, yet allow the internal water vapor to escape.

While chemical engineers and patent attorneys can debate the pluses and minuses of these hyphenated brand names, the bottom line for you is a wide choice of fabrics that keep you comfortable during the most strenuous exercise in the coldest of climates.

Layering

One of the easiest ways to stay warm outdoors is layering, especially when you are active. Not only does it allow you flexibility to add or remove layers, but the layers trap warm air inside the body, providing natural insulation. Layering is why wearing three shirts are usually warmer than having a single coat.  For very cold weather applications, such as skiing, the layering principal is as easy as “1-2-3”:

Layer 1 – Long underwear/base layer

Layer 2 – Insulating tops and pants

Layer 3 – Outerwear

Yet technology has taken over something as simple as layering. Under Armour® began in the 1990s when a University of Maryland football player got tired of sweating through his t-shirt. Now a multi-million dollar athletic apparel supplier, the company has developed a number of innovative underwear products specifically designed for cold weather. Its ColdGear® material starts with a soft inner layer which channels moisture to an outer layer where rapid evaporation takes over.

Fit and Function

Of course, the most sophisticated technology in the world won’t mean much if your jacket doesn’t fit. And the more active you are, the more important fit is. When you try the jacket on don’t just stand and look in the mirror, make sure it gives you mobility. You don’t need an in-store ski run to know if the jacket will work on the slopes. “As long as the garment gives you full range of motion, that should replicate anything you will put it through while outdoors,” says  Columbia Sportswear. Columbia Sportswear has two fits to choose from: Authentic, which is not too fit, but not too loose, and Relaxed, which is generously cut for comfort.

Versatility is another important factor in shopping for a jacket.  While some outdoor activities tend to have special requirements in a jacket (e.g., skiers and hunters need different kinds of zippers, pockets, flaps and hoods), the more uses you can get for a jacket, the smarter your investment.

Men, Women and Children

Winter attire is like most clothing with different versions for men, women and children.  Besides the obvious differences in sizing, styling seems to be the most important consideration. “Men are about function first, fashion second,” says Columbia. “Women are looking for fashion with function. Kids are all about perception of warmth, because their parents are buying the product.”

Yet gender and age differences in winter clothing aren’t all about style. “Not only are body shapes different,” says Trespass, “but there is different motion to consider. This is not just about giving a jacket a ‘cute’ figure, but pocket placements, hood shapes and other features are all dictated by the end user and their needs.”

So, you want to stay warm, you want to stay active and you want to look good. Have no fear; advanced technology is here to serve you.

-Ski Bum

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GEAR UP FOR THE HUNT

Getting ready for hunting season? Here are 15 essentials. It may not be you want, but if you have these, you’re ready.
 
1. Firearm or Bow
2. Arrows or Ammo
3. License
4. Game Calls
5. Flares, Mirrors
6. Field Boots
7. Knife
8. Map
9. Blaze Orange or Camo Hat
10. Blaze Orange or Camo Coat
11. Binoculars
12. Decoys
13. Scents, Attractants, Coverups
14. Hand/Toe Warmers
15. First Aid Kit
 
Hunting may well be the most gear- and gadget-intensive sport on Earth. You don’t have to have the best and latest equipment, but then you don’t have to come back with a trophy, either. With so much that is essential, here’s a very broad overview to buying hunting gear.
 
The Weapon of Choice
 
It all starts with the weapon; after all, how many people do you know who hunt bare-handed? As for rifles and shotguns, there are a tremendous number of choices available, from the budget-priced to the expensive and very expensive, from the standard to the exotic, from the powerful to the very powerful. With so many choices, the best advice on selecting a rifle or shotgun is work backward. That is, determine what game you’re after, then select the right ammunition, then the right gun for that ammunition.
 
As for cartridges or pellets, you want to be a responsible hunter so the animal is killed quickly. That means a big enough bullet for a clean kill while preserving as much meat as possible. Lighter bullets tend to be more accurate over shorter distances, but obviously they have less killing power at longer range.
 
After ammunition, you still have a lot of choices. For repeating rifles you’ll need to select bolt, pump or lever action, which is mostly a matter of personal preference. So much of choosing a rifle or shotgun is personal, and what feels good on your shoulder. There are also a lot of technical information available, and manufacturer’s websites (www.remington.com, for instance) will help you match the exact rifle or shotgun to fit your needs.
 
Of course budget is a factor, but it shouldn’t prevent anybody from starting out. “You can get a very good entry-level rifle or shotgun at a modest price,” says Remington, “and as you continue your hunting career you can move up.”
 
Bows (and Arrows)
 
Bow hunting goes back a few years (almost 40,000, in fact). And while the fundamentals haven’t changed much, the equipment is a lot more sophisticated than in the days of Fred Flintstone. Most hunting today is done with compound bows that use a series of cables and pulleys that reduce the amount of power needed to pull the string back.
 
Generally, the longer the brace height the more accurate the bow. Accomplished hunters can probably do well with a 6-inch brace, but an average hunter (or if your accuracy has been declining — be honest) should probably use a 7-inch. Some professionals use an 8-inch brace.
 
Quietness and lack of vibration are critical for successful bow hunting, because if the deer can hear the string, it can “jump-the-string” and get out of the way before the arrow arrives. This is an area where manufacturers have made great strides, including anti-vibration and damping accessories, as well as with ready-to-shoot packages where these items are built in.
 
The speed of the arrow (measured in FPS — feet per second) gets a lot of attention because the quicker the arrow arrives, the more likely a clean kill. However, some hunting authorities discount the importance of speed unless you’re hunting mule, deer or antelope at longer distances. In most cases, arrows that are not too heavy can take a target down within 40 yards.
 
Arrows are measured in grains per pound of draw weight. A heavy arrow (8-10 grains) will absorb vibration and produce smoother, quieter shots, while light arrows (under 6 grains) will be faster and have a flatter trajectory. Medium weighted arrows (6-8 brains) are a good choice for beginners.
 
The stiffness of the arrow is also a factor. Most manufacturers provide a chart for recommended stiffness, based on the length of the arrow, desired weight of the point and desired draw weight. Aluminum arrows provide reliable flight and penetration at a lower cost. Spend a little more for carbon arrows which will last longer without sacrificing speed and trajectory.
 
Knives
 
A good knife is a must-have for hunters. Bow hunters may want more flexibility with a utility tool that will help them adjust bow pulleys. For others the ability to skin game after the kill will be most important. The weight and portability of the knife is important, especially how well it fits into your supply pack or belt. Folding knives mean less storage space. For durability look for “full tang” construction. This means there is a single piece of metal all the way through the handle.
 
Scent Elimination
 
A deer’s sense of smell is 60 times more powerful than a human’s, and depending on wind that deer can smell you a mile away (literally). You want to remove your human scent, but you don’t want to replace it with something the animal will still recognize as dangerous. Washing with regular soap merely replaces one scent with another, and a deer will be very leery of the smell of soap.
 
While it is impossible to completely eliminate your human scent, the key for a hunter is to get that scent down to trace levels so you can get close enough to the deer without setting off their olfactory alarms. “Deer constantly smell predators,” according to Wildlife International, makers of Super Charged Scent Killer®, “but it’s only when the smell is powerful enough that they will react to it. If you can keep your odor at trace levels, you can get as close as you need to make a kill.” Super Charged Scent Killer works at a molecular level, preventing molecules from forming into gaseous odors. Another advantage over conventional soap is that the product will last longer than a day.
 
Besides eliminating odors, there are scent masks that will help you blend into your surroundings. There are pine, acorn, apple, cedar and other ‘natural’ scents that will help you become unobtrusive to your prey.
 
Seeing the Target
 
While your sense of smell may never match the animals you hunt, there are numerous ways to improve your vision. Binoculars will help you spot game, but nothing will beat laser range finders in precisely measuring distance to the target. This is extremely important in bow hunting, where misjudging distance will put the arrow over or under the target and risk wounding (but not killing) the animal.
 
Bushnell Optics rangefinders include Angle Range Compensation Targeting Modes that will provide true horizontal distance from 5 to 99 yards for bow, and bullet drop/holdover data from 100 to 800 yards for rifle.
 
These rangefinders include different modes:
 
SCAN — across the course while viewing a continuously updated LCD display of the distance between you and your target.
 
BULLSEYE — geared for close-range use, this mode acquires the distances of small targets and game without inadvertently measuring background target distances. When more than one object is acquired, the closer of the two objects is shown on the LCD display.
 
BRUSH—ignores the foreground, such as brush, boulders and tree branches, and provides distances on the LCD display to background objects only.
 
Rangefinders are an outstanding tool for hunters, but they can only do so much. “The problem some people have is with expectations,” says Bushnell. “They see the word ‘laser’ and they think it is some kind of ‘Star Wars’ device that’s going to make them amazing hunters. The rangefinder is a tool — a good tool — but it doesn’t eliminate the need for skill with a rifle or bow.
 
And that really applies to any piece of hunting equipment. It can make you more comfortable, it can improve your ability to see the animal, it can even help you shoot; but ultimately, hunting comes down to you versus the animal.
 
-Deer Abby
 
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DRESS FOR SUCCESS

No matter what, when or where you hunt, every moment you spend fighting the cold, wind and rain means less quality time actually hunting. So knowing what’s new in apparel and boot design can help make you a more comfortable and maybe even a more successful hunter.

Every hunter knows the benefits of layering. Multiple layers of clothing, starting with a light-weight base layer, help keep you warm and dry in cold temperatures and remain comfortable by removing outer layers when temperatures rise. A tight, body-hugging base layer can, however, sometimes bind and make you feel uncomfortable even after just a few hours. Worse yet, it might even restrict your mobility just when you need it most.

If that’s ever happened to you, you’ll really appreciate new Evolution Cold Gear from Under Armour. It’s the first breathable base layer legging and mock designed specifically for hunters. “Our Evolution Cold Gear includes all the moisture-management and Armourblock odor protection you expect when our name is on the label,” says Under Armour. “It also features a soft inner layer for excellent all-day comfort, along with a slick-finished, low-friction outer layer and slightly looser fit hunters need to move around more easily.”

If you hunt in extreme cold or spend hours waiting patiently in a blind, look for base layer clothing that offers maximum thermal protection. Under Armour’s new Base Layer 3.0 legging and crew, for example, feature a special breathable heavyweight fabric grid designed to trap heat and channel it across body surfaces. “Base Layer 3.0 gear, topped with an ultra-warm Hurlock Hoody, is an exceptionally warm, dry and comfortable combination,” according to Under Armour.

When shopping for outerwear, look for quality-made waterproof and breathable parkas and pants with plenty of extras. Don’t wait until a cold, rainy and windy day to discover how convenient a pack-away hood, deep cargo-style pockets and pants with draw cord adjustable ankles can be.

Scent-blocking and noise are other important considerations. Animals have highly developed senses. Most can detect your scent or hear you before you ever see them. Hunters have long relied on odor neutralizers, scent-blocking laundry detergents and fabric softeners to help solve the problem. But now, there’s a high-tech solution.

Waterproof and breathable Scent-Factor parkas and pants from Yukon Gear feature a soft, scent-inhibiting, silver ion-treated micro-fleece inner lining. Fabrics treated with silver ions were first used in hospital operating rooms. Undetectable by sight, smell or touch, silver ions inhibit the growth of odor causing microbes such as bacteria and fungus. Yukon Gear Scent-Factor protection is good for up to 50 washings. The ultra-soft outer fleece layer is also extremely quiet.

“In addition to solving the scent and noise challenges, the Mossy Oak Break-Up Infinity camo design also makes the hunter practically invisible,” according to Yukon Gear. “The design has amazing detail and an almost three-dimensional depth.”

Hunting boots are usually constructed of fabric, leather or rubber uppers, and a rubber or synthetic bottom called an outsole. When shopping for boots, start by carefully considering how you’ll use them. Will they be worn more for walking through open fields, or standing in a blind for hours? Will the ground be rocky, muddy or sandy? Will the terrain be hilly or flat? How important is waterproofing, weight and insulation for the type of hunting you do?

Waterproof field boots with sturdy leather uppers provide excellent protection from rocks, thistles and thick vegetation. The right fit is important. Allow just a little “wiggle room.” Too much movement may eventually cause blisters. Padded insoles provide added comfort, even if your feet are normal, flat or highly-arched. Some insoles are treated to prevent bacteria and odor buildup. Boots may be un-insulated or insulated with felt, foam or Thinsulate, which is a heat-trapping microfiber padding available in different weights. The higher the number, the greater the insulating capacity.

If you hunt in swampy, marshy grounds or wetlands, consider a quality-built rubber boot. The best feature 100% waterproof construction, protective toe caps, sturdy rubber outsoles, drawstring collars and scent-free camouflage imprints. “Our Swampwalker rubber boot is designed for comfort and outstanding field performance,” says Itasca Boot. “Important extras include a super-warm 1000-gram Thinsulate inner and an ankle-fit design that securely holds your foot in the boot, so you can walk comfortably and confidently even in muddy terrain.”

Recent advancements in boot design include the use of new materials and the introduction of new comfort-fit technology.

Servus Boots, which has been keeping fire rescue workers safe for over fifty years, now offers a new waterproof boot that combines neoprene and rubber construction  “Neoprene boots have superior insulating property, that’s why deep sea divers use them when cold weather diving,” according to Servus Boots. “Our Outdoor Comfort Series Hi Boot has a cold-beating closed-cell neoprene sock, overlaid in UV-resistant 100% virgin rubber. Toe, heel and Achilles reinforcements provide added protection, and our tough, durable Geo Trac outsole is designed to be slip resistant.”

The RutMaster boot from Irish Setter introduces a whole new level of comfort. It features durable, scent-free, all-rubber construction, 1200-gram Thinsulate insulation and an exclusive ExoFlex comfort-fit system. “ExoFlex technology allows panels in the back of the boot to expand and, once the foot is securely in place, then detract for a lock-tight fit,” says Irish Setter. “It not only makes RutMaster the easiest on-off boot every designed, ExoFlex technology also holds the ankle in an anatomically correct position so you’ll enjoy an optimum fit and amazing all-day comfort.”

Before choosing any boot, be sure the outsole tread design matches the terrain you hunt. A shallow tread with a thin wavy pattern will provide good traction when traveling through mud, grass and other slick surfaces, but is not recommended for climbing over steep terrain. Tall lugs or thick rubber cleats will dig into hard surfaces such as rocks and clay, but can easily pack with mud if you suddenly move to swampy or marshy ground. Shallow lugs or air bobs, which are rounded knobs with hollow cores, offer good all-around traction and grip, yet may pickup and hold mud in extremely wet or soggy terrain.

You don’t “ready, fire, aim” when you hunt. Don’t do it when you shop for hunting apparel or boots. If you’re not in the know, just ask a Dunham’s professional to explain how new advancements in apparel design and boot construction can help make you a more comfortable and maybe even a more successful hunter.

-Deer Abby

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