Keep Your Cholesterol Healthy

[Written by Peter Nielsen].

Approximately one in every six adults—17% of the U.S. adult population—has high blood cholesterol! We’re also seeing a sharp rise in children with high cholesterol. This is a dangerous condition, and it comes with a sharp increase of risk for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. It’s important to know that high cholesterol often can be reduced through regular exercise and a healthy diet.

Add these items to your menu to help lower your cholesterol levels.

  • The fiber in oatmeal mixes with cholesterol in the small intestine and attaches to the cholesterol molecule, helping to flush them from the body.
  • Eating fatty fish can help lower your blood pressure tthe high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends eating at least two servings of fish a week.
  • Pinto beans may actually be more efficient than oatmeal when it comes to lowering cholesterol. A study from the University of Colorado found that eating a half-cup of pinto beans a day for eight weeks resulted in an average drop of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol of more than 8 percent, while eating half-cup of oatmeal will reduce cholesterol 2 percent to 3 percent!
  • Garlic can prevents plaque from clogging your arteries by keeping cholesterol particles from sticking to artery walls. Fresh garlic is best.
  • Studies show that macadamia nuts and other nuts are helpful in the fight against bad cholesterol. In one study published in the April, 2008, researchers reported that 1.5 ounces of macadamia nuts eaten daily reduced total cholesterol by 9.4 percent and low-density lipoprotein by 8.9 percent. Walnuts are also excellent for reducing cholesterol levels.

Along with lowering the ‘bad cholesterol’ you want to be sure your ‘good cholesterol’ gets a boost:

  • Foods that are high in soluble fiber, such as flax seed, apples, and oranges will help keep HDL levels at a healthy level.
  • Fatty fish not only lower LDL levels, it helps raise HDL levels!
  • Cranberry juice has been shown to increase HDL levels.
  • Monounsaturated fats such as canola oil, avocado oil, or olive oil and in the fats found in peanut butter can increase HDL cholesterol levels without increasing the total cholesterol.
  • Aerobic exercise has been shown to have a highly beneficial effect on HDL.

The only way to know if you have high cholesterol is through testing. However, the following factors raise your risks of high cholesterol. If any of them describe you, and you haven’t been tested, see your doctor!

  • Lack of exercise)
  • Poor  diet
  • Smoking
  • Specific medications
  • Age
  • Family history of high cholesterol
  • Weight – even a few extra pounds can increase your cholesterol

The American Heart Association states that high cholesterol levels can result in heart attacks, strokes and other preventable diseases. So take control and give yourself a longer, healthier life!

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Stay Concealed

Not getting noticed is key but blinds can offer much more.

Hunting is about more than just finding game in the wild. It’s also about making sure they don’t find you.

You can wear camouflage and try to keep perfectly still. But staying still and quiet can be difficult when hunting in a group or with kids, and camouflage equipment can be costly. You can’t control the weather or the wind carrying your scent, but you can keep yourself hidden by adding a specific tool to your arsenal—a hunting blind.

There are several kinds of blinds available. One variety is the ground blind, which sits on the ground like a tent. Pierce FollansbeeDelong of Barronett says these are great for anyone new to blinds because they’re portable and eliminates the need to buy a lot of camouflage clothing. To help you stay concealed, you’ll only need to wear dark clothing while you’re inside.

“With a ground blind you can also get away with more,” said FollansbeeDelong “This is especially crucial in bow hunting when you’re drawing back the bow. They’re also a great way to introduce kids to the sport because ground blinds allow them to move around without being seen.”

A ground blind is versatile. You can be protected from adverse weather conditions and keep your scent isolated to one area. It can sit anywhere, so you don’t need a tree. And you can get closer to whatever you’re hunting.

“Being eye level with a deer on the ground is a completely different experience than being in a tree stand above one,” said FollansbeeDelong. “The excitement and the connection is truly unmatched.”

A blind can even make it easier to hunt with friends rather than by yourself.

“A lot of people like to hunt together, and filming hunts is becoming more and more popular,” said FollansbeeDelong. “Bigger ground blinds allow you to hunt together and stay concealed.”

FollansbeeDelong said it is also important to consider window configuration when buying a blind. The window configuration should match up with the style weapon you’ll be using.

There are several Barronett blind options at Dunham’s Sports this season, including the new Blaze Orange Safety Cap. These add safety to your hunt by making sure other hunters can see your blind.

Take your hunting game to another level this fall. Stay hidden with a ground blind from Dunham’s Sports.

-Deer Abby

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The Buck Stops Here

Great Tales About Whitetails.

After a long but satisfying day in the field, three hunters share their personal deer stories around the campfire.

Lucky Shot

Seven years ago, Mike Bay received permission from his son-in-law’s family to hunt their property near Charlevoix, Mich. A blind was already set up about 200 yards from the house, which was convenient – perhaps too convenient – since he fell asleep in it.

“I was awakened by a herd of deer. I searched around and couldn’t find my pistol. The deer heard me desperately looking for the gun and ran away. I finally found the pistol and managed to shoot a deer as the herd ran toward the house,” Bay said.

He searched the area, looking for signs that his shot had been true. He was about to give up when he found the deer about 30 feet from the house.

“I had shot it through the heart with a pistol from 50 yards. That’s impressive. A couple months later I went with a buddy and set up a target 50 yards away to recreate my marksmanship. He hit the target with all six shots with a rifle and I missed with all six. The deer I shot in 2010 was the first and only one I ever harvested. I have done a lot of deer hunting and that was the only time I was successful. I guess that day was my lucky day,” he said.

The Eyes Have It

Albin Campbell has been hunting in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula since he can remember. Out of all his hunting excursions, last year’s stands out.

“It was the second day of deer season and I had a group of guys with me. After not seeing anything in the morning, we decided to get out again shortly after noon. I had set up a deer camera near my blind to see what kind of deer was coming through. As I set my gun down to check the camera, I saw the head of a buck about 70 yards. I grabbed my gun as the deer stood up and looked at me. He was beautiful. I’m new to having glasses and realized I didn’t have them on. I put the gun up, squinted my eyes, squeezed the trigger and boom, got him. The way I look at it, it was my first deer kill without wearing proper eyewear.

The Call of the Wild

In 2009, Steve Batory was hunting with his nine-year-old grandson, Carter. It was Carter’s first hunting trip.

“We had hunted all morning when we saw a big doe. Carter said, ‘Take her, Pa.’ I shot her with a bow and decided this was a great opportunity to teach Carter how to track deer. We found it in a briar patch and as we’re dressing her, another deer stood out of the patch, staring at us. Soon, other deer started making noises. Eventually, this big buck came over and soon there were four bucks within 10 yards of us. Suddenly, we heard a loud grunt and a roar. In all the years I had been hunting, I had never heard a deer make a noise like that. The dominant buck was chasing all other bucks away from the doe.I explained to my grandson that he’ll likely never see or experience anything like that ever again,” Batory said.

-Deer Abby

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