Spring Salads

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
Spring is around the corner and with it comes fresh, local salad greens. Buying local produce offers fresher vegetables, which means a crisper salad with more flavor and nutrition. There’s a wide array of lettuce to add texture, taste, and interest along with increased nutritional value to your salads.
 
Here are some of the most commonly available varieties of lettuce that will really add a punch to your spring salads!
 
Arugula comes from the mustard family and has peppery flavor. Young, fresh leaves are lightly pungent and will add spice to your salads. Arugula is low in calories and contains fiber, vitamins A and C, and calcium. It is a good source of vitamin K, which helps blood clot properly.
 
Baby bok choy has a crunchy, celery-like texture and a refreshing taste. It is an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K and a good source of B complex vitamins
 
Dandelion greens add a bitter, tangy taste to salad. One cup has 100% of the daily recommendation of the antioxidant, vitamin A. It is also a good way to get the calcium your bones need.
 
Endive is another low-calorie, high-fiber green that is rich in potassium. It comes in many varieties from the peppery frisee to the mild escarole. Add some red radiccio to brighten up your salad with some extra color!
 
Spinach is nutritious and flavorful, alone or mixed with other salad greens. It is rich in antioxidants, is a good source of vitamins A, B2, C and K, and also contains magnesium, manganese, folate, iron, calcium and potassium.
 
Watercress is also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium. It is an excellent source of the antioxidants beta-carotene and lutein along with glucosinolate, a compound which has been shown to have anti-cancer properties.
 
Not a big salad-eater? You should be, they’re great for losing or maintaining weight, while offering important nutritional benefits.
 
Add fiber to your diet which can help lower cholesterol levels and prevent constipation.
 
Increase blood levels of many powerful antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, folic acid, lycopene, and alpha- and beta-carotene … especially if your salad includes raw vegetables.
 
Enhance satiety with fewer calories! Studies show that eating a low-calorie first course of 150 calories or less reduces the total number of calories eaten during a meal.
 
Salads … refreshing, tasty and healthy. What a great way to greet the new season!
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail or text message programs (or both). Sign Up Now

Spring Into a New Walking Routine

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
Walking has increased in popularity as a method of exercise and transportation over the past few years. Statistics show that if you’re going somewhere within a mile of your home, chances are that you’ll walk … especially if you have either sidewalks or paved roads. Unfortunately, we’re still not walking – or taking part in other physical activities – enough. Walking is the most popular aerobic activity with approximately 6 in 10 adults reporting that they walked for at least 10 minutes in the previous week. That’s something, but ten minutes is definitely not enough. It’s spring, what a beautiful time of the year to begin a new walking routine!
 
Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh found that overweight people who walked briskly for 30 to 60 minutes a day lost weight even if they didn’t change any other lifestyle habits and researchers at the University of Colorado found that regular walking helped to prevent peripheral artery disease. Plus you get all the benefits of consistent aerobic exercise … and walking is one of the easiest forms of exercise. All you need is a good pair of shoes and the will to do it.
 
Where to start? A walking program is like any other activity, you need a plan to succeed. At the beginning you want to decide a basic goals for your walks and the methods you use to attain those goals. Then you can get to work!
 
Start slow. Walk for 10 minutes, and walk back every day for a week. If you’re comfortable after a week add five minutes to your walk. Continue adding 5 minutes to each walk until you reach your goal.
 
Hold your head up and eyes forward with your shoulders should be down and relaxed. Move forward with a natural stride.
 
Drink plenty of water before, during, and after walking. Start with a slow, warm -up pace, pause and do a few warm up / flexibilty stretches. Walk for the desired length of time or distance and end the walk with the slower cool down. After your walk, do some stretches.
 
Your walking pace should be fast enough that it’s hard to sing, yet slow enough that it’s to talk.
 
Make daily walking a habit. Walk fast enough to reach your target heart rate, but not so much that you are gasping and unable to breathe. Motivate yourself by keeping a journal.
 
According to the American Heart Association, walking for at least 30 minutes a day:
 
Reduces your risk of coronary heart disease.
Improves your blood pressure and blood sugar levels.
Improves your blood lipid profile.
Helps maintain your body weight and lower the risk of obesity.
Enhances your mental well being.
Reduces the risk of developing osteoporosis.
Reduces the risk of developing breast and colon cancer.
Reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
 
Walking … it’s easy and so good for you!
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail or text message programs (or both). Sign Up Now

Stress

[Written by Peter Nielsen].
 
The American Psychological Association recently published their Stress in America™ survey. This annual survey was conducted from August 4th to the 29th of 2014 and included 3,068 adults ages 18 and older. It found that 75 percent of Americans experienced at least one symptom of stress in the past month. Twenty-five percent of those surveyed said stress has a’ very strong’ or ‘strong’ impact on their physical or mental health. That is a stunning number!
 
Causes of stress include finances, work, family concerns and health issues. Whatever the concern, studies have shown that stress can negatively affect your health! It is common for stress to lead to sleep deprivation, headaches, anxiety and depression, and the long-term effects of stress can go much further than that.
 
Heart health. In 2013, the Oxford Journal published an analyses of 7268 men and women from the British Whitehall II study that included 18 years of follow-up. The study found that participants who reported that stress has affected their health ‘a’ lot or ‘extremely’ had a 2.12 times higher risk of coronary incidents, including death, when compared with those who reported no effect of stress on their health. Other studies, from different respected organizations, have come to the same conclusion.
 
Diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, stress may alter blood glucose levels and increase risks for diabetes in two ways.
 
Stress effects people’s activities, including alcohol consumption, exercise levels and dietary planning.
 
Stress hormones may directly alter blood glucose levels.
 
Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease affects 1 in 20 people aged 65 and over, a number that increases to approximately half of people aged 85 and older! The University of California – Irvine has devoted much research to investigating the effect of stress on Alzheimer’s disease. They found that patients with Alzheimer’s disease have elevated levels of cortisol in their blood streams … cortisol levels are increased by stress. Additionally, a study has also shown that people with stressful lives are around 2-3 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than others.
 
Decreasing the stress in our lives and managing our reaction to stressful situations is vita. Reducing stress is difficult, we are busy, worried about day-to-day problems with work, our families and our communities, but there are some steps you can take to significantly reduce the physical and emotional effect it has on your life.
 
Ask yourself what you can do about the sources of your stress. You can’t control everything, but you can control how you respond.
 
Learn and use relaxation techniques. Try breathing exercises, prayer and/or meditation.
 
Exercise regularly. You’ll feel better and be more prepared to handle problems.
 
Eat healthy. Focus on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein. Avoid sugar or junk foods.
 
Teach yourself to say no when confronted with a stress-inducing situation.
 
Take the time for personal interests.
 
Get enough rest and sleep. Your body needs time to recover from stressful events.
 
Spend time with people you love.
 
If stress is making life difficult, and you need help, talk with a counselor or take a stress management class.
 
*To receive exclusive Dunham’s coupons and information on new products, events and sales, enroll in our e-mail or text message programs (or both). Sign Up Now