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The Hot Setup

A great pair of high-tech winter boots can keep your tootsies toasty warm on the coldest winter days.
 
Cold, wet feet. What could be worse? Only the proverbial “sharp stick in the eye” could be more uncomfortable on a damp and frigid winter day.
 
For those of us who refuse to spend the colder months confined to our home, few things are as important as a great pair of boots. When I was a kid, eons ago, winter foot protection called for heavily oiled or waxed leather boots pulled on over multiple layers of woolen socks that my grandmother knitted or rubber boots over shoes. The first couldn’t be counted on to keep the water out while the latter provided minimal protection from frigid temperatures and were seemingly designed to make one stumble awkwardly to the accompaniment of thumping and squishing sounds.
 
Thankfully, modern technology has changed all that. Today’s best boots can keep the outdoor enthusiast warm and dry for hours on end. They’re far lighter in weight and more comfortable than the boots of old and the best of the lot don’t limit mobility.
 
Dunham’s carries a wide range of outdoor footwear including the latest winter boots from Under Armour, Columbia and Ranger.
 
The Under Armour Clackamas boot for men and women was first seen at the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Now this high-tech premium boot is in full production and available at Dunham’s. With 200 grams of PrimaLoft® insulation, the boot can ward off the worst of winter’s cold. According to Iiley Thompson, Senior Director, Outdoor Footwear for Under Armour, PrimaLoft insulates better over a longer period of time than other common insulating materials.
 
“We took a ton of weight out of these boots,” says Thompson. “They’re ideal for trekking around in the snow.”
 
Columbia Sportswear’s Bugaboot is a waterproof lightweight boot that’s available for men and women. Mark Waddle of Columbia, says the boots are temperature rated to -25°F. A Techlite™ lightweight midsole provides superior cushioning and high energy return. A full 200 grams of insulation helps ensure long-lasting cold-weather comfort.
 
The Apun winter boot from Ranger features a waterproof lower boot stitched to a flexible oiled-suede leather upper. A 3/4-inch removable foam liner provides insulation to keep feet warm even when temperatures reach -50°F. A steel shank supports the arch, and a ClawMax outsole provides superior traction in winter weather.
 
The great outdoors is a wonderful winter playground, but it’s no fun if you don’t have the right gear. Stop by Dunham’s today to try on some winter boots and see our full range of outdoor apparel. Your Dunham’s sales consultant can help you choose exactly what you need to stay warm and dry all winter long.
 
-Your Friends at Dunham’s
 
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Under Armour: A History of Innovation

The axiom is that if you build a better mouse trap, the world will beat a path to your door. In 1996, Kevin Plank decided he wanted to build a better T-shirt, one that would help athletes better regulate their body heat by wicking perspiration away from their body, thereby keeping them cooler and dryer. He created the original compression T-shirt and founded Under Armour.
 
Under Armour’s desire for innovation quickly resulted in the ColdGear® mock turtleneck, which was launched in 1998. Still available today, ColdGear products give wearers the ability to battle the elements with a soft, brushed inner layer that circulates heat, and an element-battling outer layer that keeps them dry and protected.
 
ColdGear Infrared
 
Helping athletes and the rest of us stay even warmer in cold weather is Under Armour’s ColdGear Infrared, introduced in 2013.
 
“ColdGrear Infrared products go well beyond the compression products favored by many cold-weather outdoor enthusiasts. It features a soft, thermo-conductive coating on the inside of the garment that absorbs and retains body heat. Then, by taking advantage of a print format also incorporated into the inner layer of the product, the absorbed heat is redistributed evenly, keeping wearers warmer longer,” said Under Armour’s Brendan Hanley.
 
ColdGear Infrared is ideally suited for any snow sport. It’s lightweight and it’s not bulky, meaning it’s not cumbersome, thereby providing full range of motion. That also makes it ideal when you’re looking to extend the season of your favorite activity. A number of my fellow golfers use wear ColdGear Infrared apparel in early spring and late fall.
 
“For those who are likely to spend a great deal of time outdoors this winter, we recommend beginning with a ColdGear Infrared baselayer that includes leggings and a fitted mock turtleneck or crew neck shirt,” Hanley added.
 
From this base, it’s easy to transition into mid- and outer layers that are sport-specific. For example, for hunters, Under Armour offers ColdGear Infrared camo jackets and pants with the company’s UA Scent Control technology. This outer layer is 100% waterproof and features tapered seams to keep you completely dry and protected from the elements.
 
“Don’t overlook the importance of keeping your extremities warm. A number of our Under Armour hats, gloves and footwear also feature ColdGear Infrared, making them ideal for colder weather,” Hanley explained.
 
For additional warmth, a number of Under Armour products, including outer shells and boots, feature PrimaLoft insulation, a proprietary combination of natural down material and high-performance synthetics for optimal warmth. It was created by an Under Armour partner.
 
“Staying warm in cold weather used to require bundling up so much that movement was difficult. That’s not the case anymore. Our products with PrimaLoft insulation, for example, are lightweight, water-resistant, breathable, and can be compressed without losing warmth. A great deal of our hunting apparel features both PrimaLoft and ColdGear Infrared technologies, ensuring warmth and maximum movement for more successful hunts,” Hanley said.
 
UA MagZip
 
One of the latest innovations from Under Armour is this year’s UA MagZip. It features an ingenious design that makes it easier to zip jackets using only one hand.
 
“Our UA MagZip features magnetic male and female connections, so the minute the zipper ends get close, they line up and snap together. This a huge leap forward for anyone who’s ever had to fumble with lining up a zipper while wearing gloves,” Hanley added.
 
The idea for the MagZip came from Under Armour’s Future Show Open Innovation Challenge, a contest that allows entrepreneurs to submit ideas for consideration. It was submitted by someone who has a family member with myotonic dystrophy, a genetic disorder that affects many parts of the body.
 
Innovations Abound
 
Here are a few other noteworthy Under Armour innovations:
 
• Charged Cotton – 2011. It features the comfort of cotton, but dries much faster and performs with an athlete’s body.
 
• Charged Cotton Storm – 2011. It adds water-resistance to Charged Cotton, enabling the wearer to stay warm and dry. This makes Charged Cotton Storm ideal for hiking, running, practicing or playing.
 
• Coldblack – 2011. There’s a reason why summer colors are lighter and winter colors are darker. Darker fabrics absorb the sun’s UV rays and heat up quickly, while lighter ones repel UV rays. Thanks to Under Armour’s coldblack, a revolutionary fabric that reflects even the nastiest heat, you can wear black (or other dark colors) even in the middle of summer.
 
Kevin Plank went well beyond building a better mousetrap. What started as a business in Plank’s grandmother’s basement is today a global, multi-billion-dollar brand, creating some of the most innovative apparel, footwear and accessories in the industry. That’s testament to the company’s dedication to continual improvement.
 
Visit your local Dunham’s Sport and speak with one of our knowledgeable experts to discover Under Armour products that can make your favorite sport or hobby more enjoyable.
 
-Your Friends at Dunham’s
 
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Stay Warmer Longer with High-Tech Apparel

Coldgear® Infrared from Under Armour Incorporates Space-Age Technology and Innovative Materials
 
By the time this magazine is available at your local Dunham’s Sports store, the Midwest is heading toward the coldest months of the year. The frigid temperatures, however, don’t have to deter you from pursuing your passion: skiing, snowboarding, ice fishing, heck, even golf if there’s no snow on the ground. And while sport-specific apparel has been available for these outdoor activities for many years, today’s technology is designed to keep you warmer longer, without being bulky. One such product available at Dunham’s Sports is the new Coldgear Infrared line from Under Armour.
 
“Our Coldgear Infrared is ideally suited for any snow sport. It’s lightweight and it’s not bulky, meaning it’s not cumbersome, thereby providing full range of motion,” said Brendan Hanley of Under Armour.
 
Coldgear Infrared products go well beyond the compression products favored by many cold-weather outdoor enthusiasts. It features a soft, thermo-conductive coating on the inside of the garment that absorbs and retains body heat. Then, by taking advantage of a print format also incorporated into the inner layer of the product, the absorbed heat is redistributed evenly, keeping wearers warmer longer.
 
“Perhaps the best analogy I can use to explain our Coldgear Infrared technology is a ceramic coffee mug. Compare that coffee mug to a paper or plastic one and I’m sure you’ll agree the coffee stays warmer longer in a ceramic mug because of the heat-transference aspect of ceramic,” Hanley explained. “The thermo-coating we use on our Coldgear Infrared has ceramic particles for the same reason.”
 
Advanced Aircraft Technology
 
If ceramic doesn’t exactly sound high-tech, keep in mind that numerous military aircraft and the Space Shuttle feature ceramic coating on their outer skins. The ceramic coating absorbs infrared waves, a kind of heat. On the Space Shuttle, the ceramic tiles also insulate the aircraft, ensuring the heat buildup during re-entry is kept away from the aircraft’s interior.
 
While traditional cold-weather gear is designed to trap body heat, Under Armour’s Coldgear Infrared goes a couple of steps further.
 
“In essence, our Coldgear Infrared garments becomes living things. They absorb the heat generated by the wearer and redistribute it, creating what we call a ‘microclimate’ inside the material,” Hanley added. While the weather may be near freezing, you can be comfortably warm, enabling you to pursue your passion for longer periods of time.
 
Start With A Solid Base
 
Dunham’s Sports carries a variety of Coldgear Infrared products. For ultimate warmth, we recommend beginning with a baselayer that includes leggings and a fitted mock turtleneck or crew neck shirt. These baselayer items sit close to the skin without the squeeze of compression apparel. They are lightweight, feature four-way stretch material for maximum flexibility and anti-odor technology to prevent the growth of odor-causing microbes. They also feature a moisture transport system that wicks perspiration away from the skin, further enhancing comfort.
 
From this base, your choices are endless and sport-specific. For example, for those of us who wish we could golf year-round in the Midwest, Under Armour offers Coldgear Infrared quarter-zip jackets. They deliver all of the features and benefits of the baselayer, plus add technology to repel water and block the wind. (PGA professional Hunter Mahan wears these products during the early and late part of the season. They’re also ideal for play during the British Open.)
 
The company’s shell jackets and snocone pants are ideal for any type of snow sports: snowmobiling, skiing, snowboarding, etc. Available in a wide variety of colors, including camo, the pants are 100% waterproof and feature fully taped seams to prevent moisture from seeping through. They are specifically designed to deliver maximum warmth where the body needs it (more in the seat and knee areas, for example) and can withstand 10,000 mm of rainfall (nearly 394 inches) in a 24-hour period.
 
The shell jackets, meanwhile, can withstand 20,000 mm of rainfall in a 24-hour period and feature a RECCO® avalanche rescue reflector to keep the wearer safe in an emergency. It also features a helmet-compatible hood with a back zip expander, ensuring the hood lies against your head, whether you’re wearing a helmet or not.
 
-Ski Bum
 
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DRESSED TO KILL — BUYING HUNTING APPAREL

Hunting is a very generic term covering a lot of wildlife and a lot of geography. There’s deer, elk, ducks, pheasant, rabbit, squirrel — the list goes on and on. You can hunt in forests, prairies, swamps, cornfields or mountains. It can be 90 degrees in September or 20-below in December.

Which is why it is so important to choose clothing based on the type of hunting you do, where you do it and when you do it. “The biggest mistake most people make in buying hunting clothes is to try to have one suit fit everything,” says Rocky Brands. “I can hunt within a 30-mile radius of my home, but that includes a lot of different kinds of hunting. Plus, weather is a big factor. You don’t want a parka in the hot days of fall.”

Choices, Choices, Choices

The type of hunting you do will be a big factor in your wardrobe. Upland hunting of pheasant and small game requires a lot of walking, so mobility and flexibility will be very important. All that walking will keep your body warm, so you likely won’t need as much insulation as when you’re sitting in a blind waiting for deer to come to you. Duck and geese hunters spend a lot of time near water, so water repellent materials are especially important.

Temperature will be a major factor in choosing clothing. In the early hunting seasons, warmth isn’t much of a factor — staying cool on hot afternoons is more of the problem. But as November approaches, bitter cold and snow mean keeping warm is a priority. Deer season in the Midwest can be very cold, so insulation is key. Thermal underwear provides an excellent base and there are numerous pants/parka/bib combinations that can keep you toasty in that deer blind. You don’t want just bulk, however, so be sure you can move around comfortably. The better the combination of warmth and movement, the more you are likely to pay.

If you need some extra heat there are plenty of artificial sources. Battery-powered socks and gloves will warm away the iciest chill, as will hats, muffs and hand warmers. Foot warmers include insoles with a heating element that will kick in when exposed to open air and provide up to 5 hours of heat.

Of course how you feel at 6 a.m. and how you feel 8 hours later after tromping around when the sun is out are two different situations. That’s why layering is important. Look for jackets, vests, raingear and hats you can take off when the temperature rises.

These Boots are Made for Hunting

Most hunters spend a lot of time walking, so comfortable boots are critical. That starts before you leave the store to make sure everything fits right. “The right fit is important in any clothing, but especially so for boots,” says Irish Setter. “After all, you don’t get blisters if your pants are too tight.”

Irish Setter suggests looking closely at the linings inside the boot. If they are loose they can become folded or wrinkled and very uncomfortable. If you do a lot of upland hunting you are more likely to accumulate mud on the soles, which can make a 2-pound boot feel like an 8-pounder. In that case look for a freer sole with a less aggressive cleat pattern. Of course, all boots are going to collect dirt and mud which can act like cement and absorb water. At the end of the day take a damp rag and remove that debris and then apply a leather care product.

Helping the Hunt

The whole purpose of hunting is to make the kill. And while your personal comfort is important, you also need clothing that will help (or not detract from) the hunt. That’s where two key issues come into play — noise and scent. Depending on material, some clothing is just noisier. If you can hear your pants when walking through the store, don’t you think that deer will hear it too?

Because animals have such a highly developed sense of smell, it’s important to mask your human scent. It’s especially important for bow and muzzle hunters who need to get very close to their prey. The “de-scenting” process can start with clothing that includes materials which absorb the human scent. Charcoal is an excellent filter and a thin layer of it within the fabric will help you mask your presence.

How you clean your clothes can also mark your presence in the field. Floral detergents are not good and scented fabric softener is the ultimate no-no; Dunham’s carries scent blocking laundry detergent and fabric softener.

There are also a number of different odor neutralizers/attractants you can use. Commercial odor neutralizers are typically sprayed, rolled or washed into garments prior to a hunt, while attractants are used on wicks placed around the hunter or dispersed on local vegetation. Cover scents are natural odors that mask the human scent and do not alarm the animal. These techniques all work well singularly or combined, so try different methods to see which fits you the best.

-Deer Abby

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